small-business

John Hope Bryant

For 100 years the world has been on a fairly consistent march towards more and more free enterprise, and deeper and more sharp edged caverns of capitalism. And for approximately 80 of those years, most of the developed world was not on a bad path.

People (entrepreneurs) created things of real value to other people, and society too, and in the process of us paying for them, productive new industries were stood up (think of the automobile industry, the wired and wireless telephone industries, etc), people were hired, and a middle class was born. And on the backend of this, the entrepreneurs themselves often got rich, enjoyed fame and lived what most would call an exceedingly successful life. But somewhere long the lines of the last 20 years, the bi-product strangely became the product.

Versus worrying ourselves about creating something of real value to society and the people within them, many (no, most) actually just fast forwarded their discussion to the profit and money part. Take an average conversation with almost anyone doing almost anything in the past 20 years, and you could add the same basic tag line.

So why did you go into business? To get rich. To make money.
So why did you become a Wall Street or London banker? To get rich. To make money.
So why did you sell that company, or buy it in the first place? To get rich. To make money.
So why did you become a professional athlete? To get rich. To make money.
So why did you become a drug dealer? To get rich. To make money.

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