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Children are natural-born entrepreneurs. When they’re toddlers, they make homemade mud pies and “sell” them to Mom or Dad. As they get older, they start to understand that adults will pay them small amounts of real money in exchange for goods or services, such as a cup of iced lemonade or walking their dog after school.

In 2013, Operation HOPE launched a pilot program in four cities–Atlanta, Denver, LA, and Oakland–to help schoolchildren in underprivileged communities learn the basics of financial literacy and entrepreneurship. In a competition, kids pitch their entrepreneurial ideas to a committee of business leaders, and the winners are given a $500 grant and help in launching their startup businesses.

As a result of this “Shark Tank for Kids,” Princess, a 6th grader from Oakland, created Sweet Tooth Bakery, which sells homemade cakes and cookies to local shops. Froylan, a senior at Montbello High School in Denver, got funding for Froy’s PCs, a computer repair business he runs out of his home.

Their stories, and many others like them, show that kids, when given the education, opportunity, and guidance, can be entrepreneurial successes.

Since many schools don’t teach financial literacy courses or offer similar opportunities, here are some ways parents can teach kids about money, financial responsibility, and entrepreneurship.

Show them how money grows.
Show your kids why investing in two shares of Nike stock will benefit them more than buying one pair of Nike Air Zoom Flight basketball sneakers. Both cost around $160, but only one of those choices will be worth anything five years from now.

Support their natural entrepreneurship.
A hot dog stand at the school football game, a car-care service, or a lawn mowing job teaches so much more than spending allowance money. When kids start small enterprises, they learn about earning, saving, budgeting, and so much more.

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Posted by Natasha Eldridge, Senior Fellow, Office of the Chairman

 

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