Thinker in Residence: John Hope Bryant — From 800CEOREAD

“The most dangerous person in the world is a person with no hope.”

~John Hope Bryant


John Hope Bryant is today responsible for more than $1.5 billion of private capital supporting low-wealth home ownership, small businesses, entrepreneurship and community development investments through Operation HOPE in under-served communities across the U.S., as well as investments in financial literacy programs and financial dignity education from South Africa to Morocco, to Saudi Arabia.

TIME Magazine 50 (Leaders) for the Future (cover story, 1994), and an Oprah’s Angel Network award recipient, John Hope Bryant is a “silver rights” entrepreneur and businessman, author, thought leader, philanthropist and the founder, chairman, and chief executive officer of Operation HOPE. Bryant has been an advisor to the last three sitting U.S. presidents, and his work has been recognized by the last 5 U.S. presidents.

Operation HOPE, America’s first non-profit social investment banking organization founded immediately following the Rodney King Riots of 1992 in South Central Los Angeles, now operates in more than 300 U.S. cities and South Africa, has served more than 1.5 million individuals, has more than 19,000 HOPE Corps volunteers, more than 5,000 partners from government, community (including faith) and the private sector, and is the global leader in financial dignity.

Former U.S. President Bill Clinton described Mr. Bryant in his bestselling book Giving saying, “John Bryant is a 41 year-old whirlwind of ideas and action. Lean, intense, focused, and completely positive in his belief in the potential of poor people to prosper, with ‘a hand up and not a hand out.” John Hope Bryant is one of the most authoritative and compelling advocates for poverty eradication in America today.


“This is a place where the new, twenty-first-century definition of freedom is expressed as self-determination—the opportunity that comes from one’s own hands and one’s own bold ideas connected to action, personal risk, personal investment, and hard work. “


Our take on John Hope Bryant’s new book, How the Poor Can Save Capitalism: Rebuilding the Path to the Middle Class

 

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