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Bringing the underprivileged into the financial mainstream would do no less than save our way of life, argues the activist John Hope Bryant.

 

The civil rights battles of the 1960s changed the course of American history. But the fight isn’t over. It just has a new front: economic empowerment.

Vast segments of the population “never got the memo” on how to save, invest, find a great job, start a business, and otherwise operate in the realm of free enterprise, John Hope Bryant asserts in How the Poor Can Save Capitalism. An activist for bringing the poor into the financial mainstream, Bryant argues that those who fail to “understand the global language of money” are nothing more than “economic slaves.” So financial education “is a new civil rights issue.”

This isn’t an entirely new thought. After the civil war, President Lincoln established the Freedman’s Savings and Trust with the mission to teach newly freed black Americans about money. Even then, it was apparent that some ability for the poor to borrow at reasonable rates, save and earn a return was in their and the nation’s best interest.

Read the complete article about the book here at TIME Magazine here.

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Get The new book, How The Poor Can Save Capitalism, here.

Watch the 4-minute movie on How The Poor Can Save Capitalism here.

Listen to the first national interview forHow The Poor Can Save Capitalism, on theSteve Harvey Morning Show here.

 

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